More information on the 20th UK/EU nephrogenesis workshop

Registration for the nephrogenesis workshop on 22 June in The Roslin Institute, University of Edinburgh is still open. A preliminary program is now available. Registration and coffee will start at 9 pm, with the first talk at 9:30. The day is expected to end at 16:30 pm.

Submission of abstracts, from which the majority of talks will be selected, will be closed on 9 June 2017.  Two keynote talks will be given by Andreas Schedl and Barry Denholm.

For all other information about the workshop, please see this previous blog entry.


The easiest kidney research fundraising you’ve ever done…

Not directly linked to kidney development, but still pretty close… On 22 June the International Kidney Cancer Coalition is organising the World Kidney Cancer Q&A Day. As part of this, the Q&A day quiz is now online. Not only very informative but for every completed quiz $5 is donated to kidney cancer research. So go there now, spend 2 minutes on the quiz, and help kidney cancer fundraising.


Peter Hohenstein

Registration UK/EU nephrogenesis workshop now open

On 22 June 2017 the 20th UK/EU nephrogenesis workshop will be held at The Roslin Institute, University of Edinburgh. Registration is now open.

As always, we have tried to keep registration fees as low as possible. PhD students and technicians will get free registration, post-docs and PIs will have a registration fee of £30. Registrations include all tea, coffee breaks and lunch breaks. These low registrations costs have been made possible by generous support from Kidney Research UK,  Transnetyx and IDT Integrated DNA Technologies. Note that if you want to use the free registration option you will need to supply a letter from your supervisor or line manager to confirm your status. This letter needs to be uploaded at the time of registration.

Keynote speakers will be Andreas Schedl from the University of Nice in France and Barry Denholm, Centre for Integrative Physiology, University of Edinburgh. Other talks will be selected from submitted abstracts. Abstracts can also be uploaded at the moment of registration.

The Roslin Institute is on Easter Bush Campus, south of Edinburgh. It is served by bus routes 15, 37, X47 and 67 from Lothian Buses. Taxi costs from the city centre to the institute are approximately £20 and take 20-30 minutes. Finding accommodation in Edinburgh is not a problem, and hotels in all price categories are available.


Peter Hohenstein

Kidney reaggregation and improved kidney imaging in the special issue on organoids in Development

The journal Development published a special issue this week on organoids. Besides a wide variety of papers on organoid systems for different tissues, two papers are focusing on the developing kidney.

Since the demonstration by Unbekandt and Davies in 2010 that the classic Auerbach and Grobstein aggregation system could be adapted to only require cell types from the embryonic kidney itself, this aggregation method or derivatives from it have formed the basis of many seminal kidney organoid papers. However, the mechanism underlying this remarkable self-organization have remained unclear. Now Lefevre et al from the Little lab, using time-lapse and confocal imaging as well as mathematical modelling, study the dynamics of this reaggregation process.They use time-lapse imaging of reaggregated kidneys to study the kinetics of the spontaneous nephron initiation. Clusters of ureteric epithelium cells formed after 8 hours, which after 48 hours was followed by the formation of cap mesenchyme clusters around them. Mathematical modelling based on these time-lapse data suggested that at least in the first 24 hours differential adhesion between cells could account for the formation of the UE clusters. Finally, the authors hypothesise that homophilic cadherin interactions could explain this clustering, and using blocking antibodies they show that P-cadherin, but not E-cadherin, is likely involved in this clustering of UE cells in the first 24 hours. In all, this is a very interesting study on the mechanism behind these aggregation experiments.

A second kidney paper in this special issue is from the lab of Seppo Vainio. Saarela et al present a method to improve the confocal time-lapse imaging of kidney rudiments which they refer to as ‘fixed z-direction’ or ‘FiZD’ imaging.  They limit the growth of the embryonic kidney in the z-direction by growing the kidney under a porous membrane but on a glass slide, with the two separated by glass beads that determine the space the growing kidney can get:


The system allows for very good development, including the formation of Loops of Henle, as had previously been observed in the Sebinger low-volume culture method. It would be interesting to see how these two different culture conditions allow this better development that the conventional method does not allow. The (confocal) imaging using the FiZD cultures is indeed superb and allows for computer-assisted cell segmentation and morphometric analysis. The FiZD system will no doubt find useful uses in the time-lapse and confocal imaging of developing kidneys.

Peter Hohenstein